Tag: EC2

How To: Launch A Jump Host In AWS Using Terraform

I have been a Hashicorp fan boy for a couple of years now. I am impressed, and happy with pretty much everything they have done from Vagrant to Consul and more. In short they make the DevOps world a better place. That being said this article is about the aptly named Terraform product. Here is how Hashicorp describes Terraform in their own words…

“Terraform enables you to safely and predictably create, change, and improve production infrastructure. It is an open source tool that codifies APIs into declarative configuration files that can be shared amongst team members, treated as code, edited, reviewed, and versioned.”

Interestingly, enough it doesn’t point out, but in a way implies it by omitting anything about providers that Terraform is multi-cloud (or cloud agnostic). Terraform works with AWS, GCP, Azure and Openstack. In this article we will be covering how to use Terraform with AWS.

Step 1, download Terraform, I am not going to cover that part 😉
https://www.terraform.io/downloads.html

Step 2, Configuration…

Configuration

Hashicorp uses their own configuration language for Terraform, it is fully JSON compatible, which is nice.. The details are covered here https://github.com/hashicorp/hcl.

After downloading and installing Terraform, its time to start generating the configs.

AWS IAM Keys

AWS keys are required to do anything with Terraform. You can read about how to generate an access key / secret key for a user here : http://docs.aws.amazon.com/IAM/latest/UserGuide/id_credentials_access-keys.html#Using_CreateAccessKey

Terraform Configuration Files Overview

When you execute the terraform commands, you should be within a directory containing terraform configuration files. Those files ending in a ‘.tf’ extension will be loaded by Terraform in alphabetical order.

Before we jump into our configuration files for our Jump box, it may be helpful to review a quick primer on the syntax here https://www.terraform.io/docs/configuration/syntax.html

& some more advanced features such as lookup here https://www.terraform.io/docs/configuration/interpolation.html

Most users of Terraform choose to make their configs modular resulting in multiple .tf files with names like main.tf, variables.tf and data.tf… This is not required…you can choose to put everything in one big Terraform file, but I caution you modularity/compartmentalization is always a better approach than one monolithic file. Let’s take a look at our main.tf

Main.tf

Typically if you only see one terraform config file, it is called main.tf, most commonly there will be at least one other file called variables.tf used specifically for providing values for variables used in other TF files such as main.tf. Let’s take a look at our main.tf file section by section.

Provider

The provider keyword is used to identify the platform (cloud) you will be talking to, whether it is AWS, or another cloud. In our case it is AWS, and define three configuration items, an access key, secret key, and a region all of which we are inserting variables for, which will later be looked up / translated into real values in variables.tf

Resource aws_instance

This section defines a resource, which is an “aws_instance” that we are calling “jump_box”. We define all configuration requirements for that instance. Substituting variable names where necessary, and in some cases we just hard code the value. Notice we are attaching two security groups to the instance to allow for ICMP & SSH. We are also tagging our instance, which is critical an AWS environment so your administrators/teammates have some idea about the machine that is spun up and what it is used for.

Btw, the this resource type is provided by an AWS module found here https://www.terraform.io/docs/providers/aws/r/instance.html

You have to download the module using terraform get (which can be done once you write some config files and type terraform get 🙂 ).

Also, note the usage of ‘user_data’ here to update the machines packages at boot time. This is an AWS feature that is exposed through the AWS module in terraform.

Resource aws_security_group

Next we define a new security group (vs attaching an existing one in the above section). We are creating this new security group for other VM’s in the environment to attach later, such that it can be used to allow SSH from the Jump host to the VM’s in the environment.

Also notice under cidr_blocks we define a single IP address a /32 of our jump host…but more important is to notice how we determine that jump hosts IP address. Using .private_ip to access the attribute of the “jump_box” aws_instance we are creating/just created in AWS. That is pretty cool.

Resource aws_route53_record

The last entry in our main.tf creates a DNS entry for our jump host in Route53. Again notice we are specifying a name of jump. has a prefix to an entry, but the remainder of the FQDN is figured out by the lookup command.  The lookup command is used to lookup values inside of a map. In this case the map is defined in our variables.tf that we will review next.

Variables.tf

I will attempt to match the section structure I used above for main.tf when explaining the variables in variables.tf though it is not really in as clear of a layout using sections.

Provider variables

When terraform is run it compiles all .tf files, and replaces any key that equals a variable, with the value it finds listed in the variables.tf file (in our case) with the variable keyword as a prefix. Notice that the first two variables are empty, they have no value defined. Why ? Terraform supports taking input at runtime, by leaving these values blank, Terraform will prompt us for the values. Region is pretty straight forward, default is the value returned and description in this case is really an unused value except as a comment.

I would like to demonstrate the behavior of Terraform as described above, when the variables are left empty

At this phase you would enter your AWS key info, and terraform would ‘plan’ out your deployment. Meaning it would run through your configs, and print to your screen it’s plan, but not actually change any state in AWS. That is the difference between Terraform plan & Terraform apply.

Resource aws_instance variables

Here we define the values of our AMI, SSH Key, Instance prefix for the name, Tags, security groups, and subnets. Again this should be pretty straight forward, no magic here, just the use of string variables & maps where necessary.

It’s important to note the variables above are also used in other sections as needed, such as the aws_security_group section in main.tf …

Resource aws_route53_record variables

Here we define the ID & Name that are used in the ‘lookup’ functionality from our main.tf Route53 section above.

It’s important to note Terraform or TF files do not care when or where things are loaded. All files are loaded and variables require no specific order consistent with any other part of the configuration. All that is required is that for each variable you try to insert a value for, it has a value listed via the variable keyword in a TF file somewhere.

Output.tf

Again, I want to remind folks you can put these terraform syntax in one file if you wanted to, but I choose to split things up for readability and simplicity. So we have an output.tf file specifically for the output command, there is only one command, which lists the results of our terraform configurations upon success.

Ok so let’s run this and see how it looks…First a reminder, to test your config you can run Terraform plan first..It will tell you the changes its going to make…example

If everything looks good & is green, you are ready to apply.

Congratulations, you now have a jump box in AWS using Terraform. Remember to attach the required security group to each machine you want to grant access to, and start locking down your jump box / bastion and VM’s.

Outro

Remember if you take the above config and try to run it, swapping out only the variables it will error something about a required module. Downloading the required modules is as simple as typing ‘terraform get‘ , which I believe the error message even tells you 🙂

So again this was a brief intro to Terraform it does a lot & is extremely powerful. One of the thing I did when setting up a Mongo cluster using Terraform, was to take advantage of a map to change node count per region. So if you wanted to deploy a different number of instances in different regions, your config might look something like…

main.tf

variables.tf

It also supports split if you want to multi-value a string variable.

Another couple things before I forget, Terraform apply, doesn’t just set up new infrastructure, it also can be used to modify existing infrastructure, which is a very powerful feature. So if you have something deployed and want to make a change, terraform apply is your friend.

And finally, when you are done with the infrastructure you spun up or it’s time to bring her down… ‘terraform destroy’

I hope this article helps.

Happy Terraforming 😉

 

How To: Launch EC2 Instances In AWS Using The AWS CLI

 

It occurred to me recently that while I have written articles on Boto for AWS (the Python SDK) I have yet to write articles on how to use the AWS CLI, Terraform and the Go SDK. All of that will come in due time, for starters this article is going to be about the AWS CLI.

To start you will need to install the AWS CLI  following these links:
https://aws.amazon.com/cli/
https://github.com/aws/aws-cli

Note you will need to make sure you have an account with an access key and have setup the required credentials under ~/.aws/ for the CLI to work. How to do this is covered near the end of the second link above to the git repo.

After that is done you are ready to rock and roll. To test it out you can run…

Assuming your default region, and profile settings are correct it should output JSON.

Launching an EC2 instance

To launch an EC2 instance from the command line use the command below replacing the variables preceded with $ with their real values.

(Assuming you have setup the required dependencies like uploading your SSH key to AWS and specifying its name in the command above this should launch your VM).

It should be noted there is a lot more you can to to tweak your instance, such as changing the EBS volume size for your root disk that is launched or tagging. You will see examples of this in my shell script. The purpose of this article is to share a shell script I have written and use whenever I want to quickly launch a test VM (which is common). For more permanent things I use an infrastructure as code approach via Terraform. But the need for launching quick test VM’s never goes away, thus this shell script was born. You will notice my script auto-tags our VM’s…I do this because in our environment if you VM isn’t tagged appropriately it is deleted + it’s courtesy in an AWS environment to tag your resources, otherwise no one will ever what tree to bark up when there is a problem such as ‘are you still using this cause it looks idle?’ 🙂

My Shell Script for Launching EC2 VM’s

After substituting the required variables at the top with your real values you can run this script. Notice that after creating the VM I capture the instance details in a file & the ID in a variable so I can subsequently tag it, and then I create a termination script…this makes for very simple operations when you need to repeatedly start and then kill/destroy/delete a VM.

Using these scripts should come in quite handy. A copy of create-instance.sh can be found on my github here.

One other thing… I use the normal AWS CLI for automation as shown here…but for poking around interactively I use something called ‘aws-shell’ formerly ‘saw’. Check it out and you won’t be disappointed !

My next post will be on Terraform or the Go SDK…but both are coming soon!

How to use Boto to Audit your AWS EC2 instance security groups

Boto is a Software Development Kit for accessing the AWS API’s using Python.

https://github.com/boto/boto3

Recently, I needed to determine how many of my EC2 instances were spawned in a public subnet, that also had security groups with wide open access on any port via any protocol to the instances. Because I have an IGW (Internet Gateway) in my VPC’s and properly setup routing tables, instances launched in the public subnets with wide open security groups (allowing ingress traffic from any source) is a really bad thing 🙂

Here is the code I wrote to identify these naughty instances. It will require slight modifications in your own environment, to match your public subnet IP Ranges, EC2 Tags, and Account names.

To run this you also need to setup your .aws/config and .aws/credentials file.

http://docs.aws.amazon.com/cli/latest/userguide/cli-chap-getting-started.html#cli-config-files

Email me tuxninja [at] tuxlabs.com if you have any issues.
Boto is awesome 🙂 Note so is the AWS CLI, but requires some shell scripting as opposed to Python to do cool stuff.

The github for this code here https://github.com/jasonriedel/AWS/blob/master/sg-audit.py

Enjoy !