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Tag: Nova

How To: curl the Openstack API’s (v3 Keystone Auth)

Published / by tuxninja / Leave a Comment

While Openstack provides a python client(s) for interactions….

I frequently, finding myself needing to get data out of it without the pain of awk/sed’ing out the ASCII art.

Thus to quickly access the raw data, we can directly query the API’s using curl & parsing JSON instead, which is much better ūüôā

Authentication

Before we can interact with the other Openstack API’s we need to authenticate to Keystone openstack’s identity service. After authenticating we receive a token to use with our subequent API requests. So step 1 we are going to create a JSON object with the required authentication details.

Create a file called ‘token-request.json’ with an object that looks like this.

Btw, if you followed my tutorial on how to install Openstack Kilo, your authentication details for ‘admin’ is in your keystonerc_admin file.

Now we can use this file to authenticate like so:

The token is actually returned in the header of the HTTP response, so this is why we need ‘-i’ when curling. Notice we are parsing out the token and returning the value to an environment variable $TOKEN.

Now we can include this $TOKEN and run whatever API commands we want (assuming admin privileges for the tenant/project)

Curl Commands (Numerous Examples!)

I sometimes pipe the output to python -m json.tool, which provides formatting for JSON. Lets take a closer look at an example.

Listing servers (vm’s)

I only have 1 VM currently called spin1, but for the tutorials sake, if I had ten’s or hundred’s of VM’s and all I cared about was the VM name or ID, I would still need to parse this JSON object to avoid getting all this other meta-data.

My favorite command line way to do that without going full Python is using the handy JQ tool.

Here is how to use it !

The first command just takes whatever the STDOUT from curl is and indent’s and color’s the JSON making it pretty (colors gives it +1 vs. python -m json.tool).

The second example we actually parse what were after. As you can see it is pretty simple, but jq’s query language may not be 100% intuitive at first, but I promise it is pretty easy to understand if you have ever parsed JSON before. Read up more on JQ @ https://stedolan.github.io/jq/ & check out the Openstack docs for more API commands http://developer.openstack.org/api-ref.html

Hope you enjoyed this post ! Until next time.

 

 

How To: Add A Compute Node To Openstack Icehouse Using Packstack

Published / by tuxninja / Leave a Comment

openstack-compute-iconopenstack-compute-iconopenstack-compute-iconopenstack-compute-iconopenstack-compute-icon

Pre-requisites

This article is a continuation on the previous article I wrote on how to do a single node¬†all-in-one¬†(AIO)¬†Openstack Icehouse install using Redhat’s packstack. A working Openstack¬†AIO installation using packstack is required for this article.¬†If you do not already have a functioning¬†AIO install of Openstack please¬†refer to the previous article before¬†continuing on to this articles steps.

Preparing Our Compute Node

Much like in our previous article we first need to go through and setup our system and network properly to work with Openstack. I started with a minimal CentOS 6.5 install, and then configured the following

  1. resolv.conf
  2. sudoers
  3. my network interfaces eth0(192) and eth1 (10)
    1. Hostname: ruby.tuxlabs.com ( I also setup DNS for this )
    2. EXT IP: 192.168.1.11
    3. INT IP: 10.0.0.2
  4. A local user + added him to wheel for sudo
  5. I installed these handy dependencies
    1. yum install y opensshclients
    2. yum install y yumutils
    3. yum install y wget
    4. yum install y bindutils
  6. And I disabled SELinux
    1. Don’t forget to reboot after

To see how I setup the above pre-requisites see the “Setting Up Our Initial System” section on the previous controller install here : http://tuxlabs.com/?p=82

Adding Our Compute Node Using PackStack

For starters we need to follow the steps in this link  https://openstack.redhat.com/Adding_a_compute_node

I am including the link for reference, but you don’t have to click it as I will be listing the steps below.

On your controller node ( diamond.tuxlabs.com )

First, locate your answers file from your previous packstack all-in-one install.

 Edit the answers file

Change lo to eth1 (assuming that is your private 10. interface) for both CONFIG_NOVA_COMPUTE_PRIVIF & CONFIG_NOVA_NETWORK_PRIVIF

Change CONFIG_COMPUTE_HOSTS to the ip address of the compute node you want to add. In our case ‘192.168.1.11’. Additionally, validate the ip address for CONFIG_NETWORK_HOSTS is your controller’s ip since you do not run a separate network node.

That’s it. Now run packstack again on the controller

When that completes, ssh into or switch terminals over to your compute node you just added.

On the compute node ( ruby.tuxlabs.com )

Validate that the relevant openstack compute services are running

 Back on the controller ( diamond.tuxlabs.com )

We should now be able to validate that ruby.tuxlabs.com has been added as a compute node hypervisor.

Additionally, you can verify it in the Openstack Dashboard

hypervisors

Next we are going to try to boot an instance using the new ruby.tuxlabs.com hypervisor. To do this we will need a few pieces of information. First let’s get our OS¬†images list.

Great, now we need the ID of our private network

Ok now we are ready to proceed with the nova boot command.

Fantastic. That command should look familiar from our previous tutorial it is the standard command for launching new VM instances using the command line, with one exception ‘–hint force_hosts=ruby.tuxlabs.com’ this part of the command line forces the scheduler to use ruby.tuxlabs.com as it’s hypervisor.

Once the VM is building we can validate that it is on the right hypervisor like so.

You can see from the output above I have 2 VM’s on my existing controller ‘diamond.tuxlabs.com’ and the newly created instance is on ‘ruby.tuxlabs.com’ as instructed, awesome.

Now that you are sure you setup your compute node correctly, and can boot a VM on a specific hypervisor via command line, you might be wondering how this works using the GUI. The answer is a little differently ūüôā

The Openstack Nova Scheduler

The Nova Scheduler in Openstack is responsible for determining, which compute node a VM should be created on. If you are familiar with VMware this is like DRS, except it only happens on initial creation, there is no rebalancing that happens as resources are consumed overtime. Using the Openstack Dashboard GUI I am unable to tell nova to boot off a specific hypervisor, to do that I have to use the command line above (if someone knows of a way to do this using the GUI let me know, I have a feeling if it is not added already, they will add the ability to send a hint to nova from the GUI in a later version). In theory you can trust the nova-scheduler service to automatically balance the usage of compute resources (CPU, Memory, Disk etc) based on it’s default configuration. However, if you want to ensure that certain VM’s live on certain hypervisors you will want to use the command line above. For more information on how the scheduler works see : http://cloudarchitectmusings.com/2013/06/26/openstack-for-vmware-admins-nova-compute-with-vsphere-part-2/

The End

That is all for now, hopefully this tutorial was helpful and accurately assisted you in expanding your Openstack compute resources & knowledge of Openstack. Until next time !