TuxLabs LLC

All things DevOps

Tag: Docker

Setting up Kubernetes to manage containers on the Google Cloud Platform

Published / by tuxninja / Leave a Comment

These days the pace of innovation in DevOps can leave you feeling like you’re jogging on a treadmill programmed to run faster than Usain Bolt. Mastery requires hours of practice and the last decade in DevOps has not allowed for it. Before gaining 10 years of experience running virtual machines using VmWare in private data-centers, private cloud software like Openstack and Cloudstack came along, and just when you and your team painfully achieved a stable install you were told running virtual machines in public clouds like AWS, GCP, and Azure is the way forward. By the time you got there it was time to switch to containers, and before you can fully appreciate those, server-less functions are on the horizon, but I digress. If you want to know more about server-less functions, see my previous article on AWS Lambda. Instead, this article will focus on running Docker containers inside of a Kubernetes cluster on Google’s Cloud Platform.

Linux Containers, which were recently popularized by Docker need something to help manage them and while there are many choices, Kubernetes the open-sourced container management system from Google is the undisputed king at this time. Given that Kubernetes was started by Google, it should be expected that the easiest way to install it is using Google’s Cloud Platform (GCP). However, Openshift from Redhat also provides a nice batteries included abstraction if you need to get up and running quickly as well as kops.

Pre-Requisites

The main pre-requisites you need for this article is a Google Cloud Platform account and installing the gcloud utility via the SDK.

In addition, you need some form of a computer with Internet connectivity, some typing skills, a brain that can read, and a determination to finish…For now I will give you the benefit of the doubt and assume you have all of these. It is also nice to have your beverage of choice while you do this, a fine tea, ice cold beer, or glass of wine will work, but for Cancer’s sake please skip the sugar.

Here is where I would normally insert a link to facts on sugar and Cancer’s link, but I literally just learned I would be spreading rumors… Fine drink your Kool-Aid, but don’t blame me for your calories.

The Build Out of our Self Healing IRC Server Hosting Containers

I lied dude, IRC is so 1995 and unfortunately, ICQ’s been dead and Slack won’t let me host their sexy chat application with game like spirit and better jokes than Kevin Heart. So…sorry to excite you… but I guess I will fallback to the docs here and install Nginx like us newb’s are supposed to.

Numero Uno (Step 1 dude)

As part of the installation of the gcloud / SDK you should have ran gcloud init, which requires you to login with your Google account via a web browser.

After clicking allow in your browser you will be logged in…and asked about creating an initial Project. Say yes (type Y and hit enter).

Sweet your Project is now created. In order to use the Google Cloud API’s you must first enable access by visiting https://console.developers.google.com/apis/api/replicapool.googleapis.com/overview and clicking enable.

That will take a minute. Once completed you will be able to run gcloud commands against your Project. We can set the default region for our project like so:

If you get an error here, stop being cheap and link your project to your billing account in the console.

Additionally, we want to set the default region/zone for gcloud commands like so:

Numero Dos Equis

We need to install kubectl so we can interact with Kubernetes.

Once that is done, quickly realize someone spent an obscene amount of time making that install as pretty as it was without using ncurses. Shout out to that geek.

Numero Tres Deliquentes

Time to create our Kubernetes cluster. Run this command and “it’s going to be LEGEND….Wait for it….

And I hope you’re not lactose intolerant cause the second half of that word is DAIRY.” – NPH

Numero (Audi) Quattro

Now you should be able to see all running Kubernetes services in your cluster like so:

And we can see the pods like so:

Numero Cinco (de Mayo)

You now have an active Kubernetes cluster. That is pretty sweet huh? Make sure you take the time to check out what’s running under the hood in the Google Compute Engine as well.

Ok, for our final act, I promised Nginx…sigh…Let’s get this over with!

Step 1, create this nifty YAML file:

Save it as deployment.yaml, then apply it!

We can describe our deployment like this:

And we can take a gander at the pods created for this deployment

To see info about a specific pod run: 

Finally it’s time to expose Nginx to the Internet

Check the status of our service

Note the EXTERNAL-IP is in a pending state, once the LoadBalancer is created, this will have an IP address.

And were all done, congratulations! 🙂

In Closing…

Kubernetes is cool as a fan, and setting it up on GCP is almost as easy as pressing the big EASY button. We have barely scraped the surface here so for continued learning I recommend buying Kubernetes Up & Running by Kelsey Hightower, Brendan Burns and Joe Beda. I would follow these folks on twitter, and in addition follow Kubernetes Co-Founder Tim Hockin as well as former Docker, Google, and now Microsoft employee/guru of all things containers Jessie Frazelle.

After you are done following these inspirational leaders in the community go to youtube and watch every Kelsey Hightower video you can find. Kelsey Hightower is perhaps the tech communities best presenter and no one has done more to educate and bring Kubernetes to the mainstream than Kelsey. So a quick shout out and thank you to Kelsey for his contributions to the community. In his honor here are two of my favorite videos from Kelsey. [ one ] [ two ].

Storing passwords securely using Pass (GPG)

Published / by tuxninja / Leave a Comment

Today we live in an endless sea of passwords, which are a very inefficient and ineffective means of securing our data & environments. Many companies are trying to solve this problem using a variety of techniques that all revolve around various forms of multi-factor authentication.

However, in the mean time were all screwed 😉

Just kidding. Quick PSA though, use two factor authentication at a minimum everywhere you can ESPECIALLY your email, since it’s used for password recovery on other sites. Ok then moving on…

There are many password managers like LastPass and 1Password, which do a fairly effective job at providing convenience and prevent you from scribbling down your passwords on paper (STOP IT !!!). However, I personally can’t get passed the whole ‘store all my passwords in one super secure vault on the Internet’ thing. To be fair some of these password managers can be downloaded on your machine and ran locally, but there are two other drawbacks to those I found.

  1. Some of them are not free and…
  2. Some of them have ugly and clunky UI’s

So what do I like/use then ? I use something called ‘pass’. Which is a command line utility that wraps GPG. The reason I use it is because…

  1. I love using command line utilities over GUI, I find it far more convenient and…
  2. I was going to write this exact utility (a GPG wrapper) until I found out someone else did and…
  3. Because I like GPG.

At most of the organizations I have worked at, password management was done poorly i.e. everyone used different approaches and there was no governance or oversight. I hope with this article to make folks aware of what I feel is a simple, effective method that every unix savvy administrator should use.

FYI Pass provides migration scripts from the most popular password manager tools on their website.

Introducing Pass

From the Pass site “Password management should be simple and follow Unix philosophy. With pass, each password lives inside of a gpg encrypted file whose filename is the title of the website or resource that requires the password. These encrypted files may be organized into meaningful folder hierarchies, copied from computer to computer, and, in general, manipulated using standard command line file management utilities.”

Where Can You Get or Learn More About Pass ? 

https://www.passwordstore.org/

Installing Pass

Depending on your operating system there are various ways to install

Ubuntu/Debian

Fedora / RHEL

Mac

Since I already installed pass on my Mac a while back I will be installing it on a Docker container with Ubuntu 16.04.

After pass successfully installs, try running it

Well that is pretty straight forward, it appears we need to initiliaze the db.

Looks like we need to provide ‘key’…can that be just anything?

Now our password store looks initialized ! Let’s try inserting a password into the DB !

Uh oh what happened ? Well remember I said it uses GPG, and we not only don’t have a gpg key setup in our Docker container, but we initialized our Pass DB without using a GPG Key (the whole point) !

To remedy this we need to create a GPG key

Creating your GPG Key

To view your GPG key run

Now we can see we have one GPG key, with the ID 5B2F89A5

Let’s try re-initializing Pass. 

But we have a problem, re-initializing Pass doesn’t get rid of our previous insert into the db. As you can see here our Pass DB is effectively corrupt.

Hmmm, what’s a guy to do….

Yes it really was that simple, and that is one more reason why I love pass.

You can also initialize your password store using git for version control, see the passwordstore.org website for more info !

Now let’s insert some good stuff.

Inserting A Password into Pass

That seems to have worked. Let’s try to retrieve the pass.

Retrieving A Password In Pass

Note, I retrieve the password twice using my GPG Passsword (You will be prompted through a curses interface to enter your passphrase). Then I run it again, because of the initial GPG migration messages just to show how it would normally work after you’ve used GPG once with Pass.

Now let’s say someone is standing over your shoulder, you want to access your passsword, but you don’t want them to see it. You can get it straight to your clipboard by using -c.

Copying Passwords To Your Clipboard

Docker Issue ?

Notice the prompt is not included in the above example ? That is cause it didn’t actually work. Apparently, it doesn’t work in Docker due to not having display dependencies installed/configured. So what I show above is the output from my mac…but my actual Docker related error was.

There might be an easy way to fix this (like install X), but I don’t usually use Docker for storing my passwords I just happen to be using it for this tutorial, so moving on !

Folders

It’s also important to note that Pass supports folder structures, as shown in my example I am creating a ‘Gmail’ folder and placing a password file called ‘myemail’ with my password in it. In reality I recommend not naming the file after your account/email and using the multiline version to encrypt those details as well. That way you can just stick to the site name for the name of the encrypted file in whatever folder or in the top level of Pass.

Multiline Encrypted Files with Pass

A common use case with Pass is adding an entire encrypted file so you can store more than just a password…

Again retrieving it is as easy as..

Finally if you no longer want the info to be stored in Pass…

If you want to copy you password to the clipboard from a multiline file, you must store your password on the first line of the file !

Deleting An Entry In Pass

Another thing, the output on my mac is much prettier than this `– thing I am getting in the Ubuntu Docker container… Not sure if that’s an Ubuntu issue or Docker, but on the Mac the output is much prettier, which can be seen on the passwordstore.org home page.

So that’s it, Pass is pretty straight forward, easy to work with, depends on GPG security and that is why I like it.

Stay secure, until next time !